The Attorney To Turn To When Things Get Tough

  1. Home
  2.  – 
  3. Criminal Defense
  4.  – Getting your license back after a suspension

Getting your license back after a suspension

On Behalf of | Mar 2, 2021 | Criminal Defense |

If you’re convicted of reckless driving in the state of California, there is a chance that your license will be suspended for at least 30 days. However, if your license is suspended, you will likely have an opportunity to get it reinstated. Let’s take a closer look at the process of getting your driving privileges back.

You might need to go to traffic school

The judge in your case may order you to attend traffic school as a condition of getting your license back in a reckless driving case. Alternatively, you may be able to participate in a driver education course as a means of avoiding a suspension. As a general rule, completing traffic school allows you to remove points from your license or have a citation removed from your driving record. A criminal law attorney might be able to talk more about how going to traffic school might help you obtain a favorable outcome in your case.

You’ll need to ask the DMV to reinstate your license

It’s important to note that your license won’t automatically renew once the suspension period expires. Instead, you’ll need to go to the DMV and ask to have it reinstated. The state charges a standard reinstatement fee of $55, and other fees may apply depending on the specific details of your case. You will also need to show proof that you have completed traffic school as ordered by the judge in your case.

How a reckless driving charge might impact your insurance premiums

You will need to show proof of insurance as a condition of getting your license back after it has been suspended. Typically, your insurance rates will increase after being convicted of reckless driving.

If you’re charged with reckless driving, it may be a good idea to hire an attorney to help with your case. Legal counsel may be able to suppress evidence that a prosecutor intends to use against you at trial. This may maximize the chances of obtaining a favorable plea deal, an acquittal or getting the case dropped before a trial starts.